Geography 2050
Geography 2050 Logo

GEOGRAPHY 2050

Powering our Future Planet

November 15-16, 2018 | New York City

Taking place at Columbia University | NYC

An Event by the American Geographical Society

CALL FOR POSTER SPOTLIGHTS
CALL FOR LIGHTNING PRESENTATIONS

POWERING OUR FUTURE PLANET


Geography 2050 is a multi-year, high-level strategic dialogue among thought leaders from academia, government, and the world of business. Organized by the American Geographical Society (AGS) in 2014, the purpose of this continuing dialog is to facilitate discussion of the major forces that will shape our planet’s future. Undoubtedly, energy will be one the most important factors influencing geopolitics, environmental quality, transportation routes, military conflicts, standards of living, world economies, food production, technical innovation, and the mass movement of people. Because of its pivotal role in the future of the human species, the theme of this year’s Geography 2050 Symposium is Powering Our Future Planet.


Bringing together people from diverse organizations and individuals with an assortment of backgrounds, AGS is developing this unique and compelling program with the cooperation of the Earth Institute of Columbia University. This partnership enhances interaction and idea exchange with thought-leaders who understand geography as a geospatial science and how it applies to meeting energy supply and demand.

THEMES

THE VITAL TRENDS THAT WILL RESHAPE THE FUTURE OF POWERING OUR PLANET

Theme 1: The Energy Context

What are the geographical dimensions of energy transitions?

Nearly everything that we identify as “modern” across our global landscape has emerged because of humanity’s energy innovations. In cities and towns buildings are lit and made comfortable, regardless of season, by all manner of energy solutions and design. Food has been cooked using wood and later by gas, electric, and even solar devices. Landscapes have been reshaped by combustion engine machinery. And, human mobility far and wide has co-evolved with the harnessing of wind, coal, oil, and electricity. The nature of these various energy resources has driven profound geographic changes to land, water, and air at local, regional and global scales from every phase of energy development and use. This session will help to build a shared understanding of how energy of all kinds has shaped the modern global landscape and identify key transitional moments in this energy history.

Theme 2: Environmental Consequences of Energy Supply and Demand

How important are location, scale, and networks in influencing the ecological consequences of energy?

Energy systems have clear ecological consequences that have impacted the sustainability of particular geographies over time. Fossil fuels have brought with them a geography of resource exploitation, distribution, and use that have hardly been pristine – with oil spills, brownfields, and pollution from emissions. Modern electrical generation, whether driven by coal, natural gas, or uranium has shaped cities and rural localities. The growing energy usage of a global population has created a geography of pollution that can only be understood by mapping change over time. This session will take a geographic lens to understanding how energy-fueled progress can be weighed against its ecological consequences.

Theme 3: Geopolitics of Energy Systems

What will be the global energy map and its geopolitical implications in 2050?

Understanding the current and projected changes in the global energy map is critical. Industrial interests, government regulatory agencies, technological advances, as well as existing and new distribution systems will shape the global energy landscape. Surveying these developments through a geopolitical lens underscores the dynamic and volatile features of energy production, potential conflict areas, and potential areas of cooperation. This session explores the geopolitical dimensions of energy futures.

Theme 4: Emerging Energy Technologies

What new technologies and approaches will reshape the energy terrain?

Many new technologies, business models, and public policies will reshape global energy patterns of supply, demand, impact, and human well-being. Shale and the exploitation of natural gas resources have had huge impacts on the energy landscape over the past decade, a trend that will likely continue. Renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, geothermal and biomass are growing at explosive rates over specific geographic areas, due to various policy, price, and environmental factors. The long-time investment in Generation IV nuclear power plants promises the potential of highly distributed, long-term base load generation. New materials like graphene, local microgrids, and new forms of energy storage offer the potential for more resilient energy infrastructures. This session investigates new energy technologies, and new technologies shaping energy, that will impact the changing geography of energy.

Theme 5: Geospatial Technologies and Energy

How will the production, distribution and consumption of energy be influenced by geospatial technologies?

Geospatial technologies and geospatial data sources have opened new frontiers in investing, monitoring, and distributing energy sources. Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, crowdsourcing technologies, geospatial big data, geospatial twists on Artificial Intelligence, and automation are enabling geographic insights to be derived and applied at the global scale to energy systems. This session will explore how geospatial technologies will shape the future of energy discovery, exploitation, generation, storage, transmission, distribution, and consumption. It will also focus on how geospatial technologies and geospatial data sources will help us tackle the complex social welfare and environmental justice issues that naturally arise from humanity’s quest for energy.

Theme 6: Social Dimensions of Energy Access

How will the growing demands of the world’s 9 billion people influence energy access, especially in the developing world?

While the industrialized countries of the world generate and consume the vast majority of the energy on the planet, they hold a minority of the global population. As the developing world hosts the rise of the global middle class, their appetite for energy will grow enormously while capital investment and access to energy may lag. There are opportunities for the developing world to leapfrog old energy technologies the same way they used wireless communications to avoid the developed world’s costly legacy of wireline telecommunications. Yet considerable social justice issues are at play, including the environmental consequences that will shape their everyday lives. This session will explore the geographies of energy poverty and energy access across the developing world, including indigenous peoples, and how we can find our way to an energy resilient future that support social justice and protect our planet.

Theme 7: Energy Adaptation Strategies

How will energy systems adapt to climate change?

Climate change will profoundly influence the adaptations that our energy infrastructure will need to accommodate. As weather patterns change, sea level rises, plants and animal distributions adjust, human migrations continue to escalate, and disease vectors are altered, energy planning will face major challenges that will impact capital investment, commodity pricing, and geopolitics the world over. Sea level rise alone will threaten an enormous proportion of generation assets located in coastal and riverine areas. As populations adapt to these changes, generation equipment, resource movement and transmission will forcibly adjust in response. Investment in new generation technologies will place increasing pressure to reduce carbon emissions. At the same time, new forms of energy production will emerge to meet new ecologically minded demand in both old and new spatial patterns of settlement. This session explores how various climate adaptations will fundamentally reshape the future geography of energy.

POSTER SPOTLIGHT: CALL FOR PROPOSALS

CALL FOR POSTER SPOTLIGHTS

AGS is accepting proposals for the Poster Spotlight section of the upcoming AGS Symposium, Geography 2050: Powering Our Future Planet, to be held November 15 and 16, 2018 at Columbia University.

LIGHTNING PRESENTATIONS: CALL FOR PROPOSALS

CALL FOR LIGHTNING PRESENTATIONS

AGS is accepting proposals for Lightning Presentations for the upcoming American Geographical Society (AGS) Symposium, Geography 2050: Powering Our Future Planet, to be held November 15 and 16, 2018 at Columbia University.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

AGS IS CURRENTLY SEEKING SPONSORS AND UNDERWRITERS TO HELP SUPPORT THE 2018 FALL SYMPOSIUM!

PREMIUM SPONSOR

$25,000

SPONSOR

$10,000

AGS TEACHER FELLOWS

$25,000

Reserved

CLOSING RECEPTION

$15,000

CHAIRMAN'S DINNER

$12,000

Reserved

MAPATHON

$10,000

Reserved

WELCOME RECEPTION

$10,000

Sold Out

THURSDAY AFTERNOON BREAK-CAUCUS

$5,000

FRIDAY MORNING BREAK-CAUCUS

$5,000

FRIDAY LUNCH

$7,500

FRIDAY AFTERNOON BREAK-CAUCUS

$5,000

Sold Out

SYMPOSIUM PACKET BAGS

$5,000

Reserved

FRIDAY MORNING BREAKFAST

$3,000

Sold Out

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT TABLES

$1,000

Event Details

Contact Us

  917-745-8354
  ags@americangeo.org

Rates & Registration


Early Registration

until 8 October

$450
AGS Affiliate: Business
$210
AGS Affiliate: Academic/Not for Profit/Government
$220
AGS Fellow: Business
$105
AGS Fellow: Academic/Not for Profit/Government Galileo Circle/Humboldt Circle/Bowman Circle
$210
AGS Affiliate: Retiree/Student/Developing World*
$650
Non-AGS Affiliate: Business*
$330
Non AGS Affiliate: Academic/Not-For-Profit/Government*
$275
Non AGS Affiliate: Retiree/Student/Developing World*
$2,000
Friend of the Symposium**

Regular Registration

9 October - 14 November

$500
AGS Affiliate: Business
$230
AGS Affiliate: Academic/Not for Profit/Government
$240
AGS Fellow: Business
$115
AGS Fellow: Academic/Not for Profit/Government Galileo Circle/Humboldt Circle/Bowman Circle
$230
AGS Affiliate: Retiree/Student/Developing World*
$700
Non-AGS Affiliate: Business*
$370
Non AGS Affiliate: Academic/Not-For-Profit/Government*
$300
Non AGS Affiliate: Retiree/Student/Developing World*
$2,000
Friend of the Symposium**

At Door Registration

15 November - 16 November

$550
AGS Affiliate: Business
$250
AGS Affiliate: Academic/Not for Profit/Government
$260
AGS Fellow: Business
$125
AGS Fellow: Academic/Not for Profit/Government Galileo Circle/Humboldt Circle/Bowman Circle
$250
AGS Affiliate: Retiree/Student/Developing World*
$750
Non-AGS Affiliate: Business*
$400
Non AGS Affiliate: Academic/Not-For-Profit/Government*
$325
Non AGS Affiliate: Retiree/Student/Developing World*
$2,000
Friend of the Symposium**

*AGS Affiliates receive discounted registration. Become an AGS Affiliate!

**For those who select this premier registration, your organization will be acknowledged as a friend and participant of the Symposium. Contact Grace Muset at: gmuset@americangeo.org

Contact